The issue with mill appointments in the medical industry

| Dec 3, 2020 | Medical Malpractice |

When people go to the doctor in Florida, they usually have a health concern. Depending on the length of time they spend describing their symptoms and asking questions, their appointment could take some time. 

Many doctors’ offices around the United States implement a mill approach to seeing patients. While their method may appear to improve productivity, it is actually a large disservice to the people they treat. 

A look at mill appointments

One of the top complaints that many people have about visiting the doctor is the seeming lack of time for patient concerns. Rushed appointments, or mill appointments, can leave patients feeling confused, unimportant and still concerned about their health. According to Merriam-Webster, the description of a “mill” in this regard is a process whereby people move in vast quantities or in a mechanical way. 

Doctors’ offices that treat their patients as if they are just a number may run into issues with dissatisfaction and even malpractice. Medical professionals who rush through appointments and overlook important details may risk misdiagnosing their patients or recommending treatments that lack customization for a patient’s needs. 

The value of time

People can encourage their doctor to spend adequate time addressing their needs. Patients who communicate and refuse to leave without satisfactory answers may help prevent malpractice and ultimately protect their health and safety. The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, National Institute on Aging recommends that people always communicate honestly and openly with their health care provider. If they feel their appointment has passed too quickly and extra time would help resolve remaining concerns, they should request more time. 

People would benefit from making a list of their questions before their appointment begins. As their doctor answers their questions, people can write down the answers to reference later on. With attention to the details, doctors can prioritize and help protect the well-being of each of their patients.