DREAMers hope personal stories will help immigration reform

| Jul 23, 2013 | Family Immigration |

If you’re like most people here in Florida, you more than likely would do anything for your family.  While to most of us this might mean helping a family member move or loaning them some money, to immigrants, this might mean petitioning the government for family visas for relatives who may still be in other countries.

But what about for family members already in this country who might not be authorized to stay in the United States?  That’s what a large group of immigrant youths wanted to bring to the government’s attention this month as the push for immigration reform continues in Congress.

There is no doubt that keeping families together has been at the center of immigration reform for months now, and that’s exactly what activists were hoping to draw from as they tried to persuade Congress to finally pass the bipartisan immigration bill.  By visiting congressional offices and telling their personal stories of family immigration, many of the activists hoped that it would be enough to sway those in the House of Representatives who were still leary of the bill.

While this effort may not change the minds of all representatives, it certaintly sparks a debate over whether the new immigration bill addresses many of the concerns surrounding family immigration.  As many of our blog readers can attest, the immigration system can sometimes take a long time and can sometimes become more complicated by accusations of being an unauthorized migrant.  The hope is that by streamling the process and offering other immigration options to those already in the country, both current and future generations will get help towards their goal of living in the United States as citizens.

Source: ABC News, “DREAMers Take Family-First Immigration Message to Washington,” Ted Hesson, July 8, 2013