Medical malpractice lawsuit filed in 2007 finally moves forward

| Oct 17, 2011 | Medical Malpractice |

Becoming a victim of medical malpractice can be extremely overwhelming. When doctors, nurses, or other medical professionals make a mistake, the results can be devastating. In some situations a medical condition is worsened, forcing the patient to deal with more medical bills and painful treatment. In other cases, the mistake can be fatal.

Victims can seek compensation by filing a medical malpractice claim against the negligent individual or organization. But even though a victim’s medical condition or situation may continually get worse, the claim can take some time to move forward.

One woman filed a medical malpractice claim four years ago and just recently was granted in a court ruling the ability to move forward with her lawsuit. The incident itself occurred several years prior, in 2004, after she was involved in a serious accident.

According to the article, the woman was transported to a hospital after crashing into a pole. However, the lawsuit alleges, the medical staff at the hospital did not give her the appropriate medical attention she needed. One doctor allegedly told the woman’s son that he would administer a neurological test but failed to do so, even though the woman showed signs of brain and head trauma.

After her release, the woman’s husband noticed some problems and brought her back to the hospital where hospital staff failed to timely administer a head scan or property treat her for her injuries.

As a result, the lawsuit contends, the woman suffered a stroke causing permanent brain damage. Her family believes that her current state could have been avoided had hospital staff been providing the appropriate standard of care.

Their medical malpractice lawsuit, while it will not restore their loved one back to her prior state of health, could result in compensation that would take care of the additional medical expenses. Not only that, but this type of lawsuit could also hold the hospital responsible for the care it provided and prevent future incidents from occurring.

Source: The Bellingham Herald: “State Supreme Court rules Richland woman can proceed in negligence case,” Kristin M. Kraemer, Oct. 14, 2011